ARTiSTORY launches its 2023 creatives to a global audience

ARTiSTORY has revealed its 2023 Spring Summer global arts and cultural trends and themes to licensees, retailers and DTC brands across the world.

The online global event on 6 April 2022 presented new collections inspired by trend research and the wealth of artists and artefacts in the archives of ARTiSTORY’s museum partners: The National Gallery, London; The Brooklyn Museum, New York; The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; The National Palace Museum, Taipei; Dunhuang Inspiration, China and the Thyssen-Bornemisza National Museum, Spain.

In addition, ARTiSTORY announced its collaboration with the Benaki Museum, Greece for a multi-year, global licensing programme, and a new partnership with the presitigious Parsons School of Design at The New School. The New York based university, which provides world-class education in design and art history, will work with ARTiSTORY’s Global Artists Programme to reinterpret museum pieces for a commercial context.

As for serving the global market, ARTiSTORY announced strategic partnership with Sevens Marketing Consulting. The two entities will work together to help Chinese DTC companies build their brand and increase sales in the global markets.

ARTiSTORY’s North America office also shared news of two new deals with Ruggable, a high-end DTC rug company and Jade City Foods, a specialty food manufacturer, who will be both working with ARTiSTORY’s museum partners for co-branded products.

Four new trend-led themes were launched: ‘Marvellous Menagerie’, ‘She Created’, ‘Glitz and Glam’, and a refreshed collection for ARTiSTORY’s popular ‘Botanical Affairs’ theme.

The new collections of prints and patterns are inspired by some of the world’s greatest artists, including Peter Paul Rubens, George Barbier, Clara Wolcott Driscoll, Maria Sybilla Merian and William Morris, with their iconically beautiful designs of florals and animals. Beatrix Potter and her famous bunnies celebrate the upcoming Year of the Rabbit and Easter. John James Audubon and George Stubbs bring together our natural environment, along with stories and legends of the Silk Road.

Female focused ‘She Created’ celebrates the work of Guan Daosheng, the oldest known artist in the collections, dating from the 13th century.

‘Glitz and Glam’ features splendid headdresses made by Chinese court artists and the flappers and feathers of the 1920s, bringing these beautiful crowns and jewels roaring back to life and ready to embrace the dazzling 2020s.

The collections are now available to licence across multiple product categories and territories, supported with storytelling content for merchandising, marketing and immersive experiences.

Yizan He, Founder and CEO of ARTiSTORY, says: “The annually refreshed themes are developed in line with the global fashion trends, and inspired by the collecitons from our museum partners. Via licensing, retailers and consumer brands can work closely with ARTiSTORY to develop attrative new product lines that are appealing to shoppers.  The ‘artifacts to merchandise’ capabilty is a key competitive strength of ARTiSTORY.”

Natasha Dyson, co-founder & licensing director, ARTiSTORY, also commented: “This was our second creative launch and we were very happy to welcome so many new attendees, in additional to those who re-joined us.  As well as presenting stunning designs our themes highlighted some important issues, such as sustainability and protecting the planet and its wildlife. We hope to encourage brands and retailers to create eco-friendly and sustainable products that also match the ethos of our museum partners”.

 

ARTiSTORY partners with the Benaki Museum, Greece

ARTiSTORY has signed global licensing rights with the Benaki Museum in Greece, adding to its growing portfolio of international cultural partners.

The Benaki Museum opened its doors in 1931 in Athens and is among the most extensive and innovative museums in Europe. Arranged across ten buildings, it welcomes over 450,000 visitors a year to its galleries and exhibitions, performing arts hub, manufacturing and research facilities and pioneering shop.

ARTiSTORY will be creating designs inspired by the Museum’s extensive collections, which include over 120,000 works of art, 200,000 books, 1 million photographs, and thousands of rare documents covering Greek and Roman Archaeology, Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Art, Early Modern Greek Material Culture, Modern and Contemporary Greek Photography, Architecture and Design, Music and Performing Arts but also Islamic, Chinese, Pre-Columbian American, African and Korean Art, as well as an extensive collection of toys and games from around the world.

The Benaki Museum joins ARTiSTORY’s prestigious group of other cultural partners: the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the National Gallery, London; Brooklyn Museum, New York; the National Palace Museum, Taipei; Dunhuang Culture & Tourism Group, China; and the Thyssen-Bornemisza National Museum, Madrid.

With offices in London, Barcelona, Boston, Singapore, Beijing and Shanghai, ARTiSTORY, with support from its investment partner Sinofaith IP Investment Company (SIPIC), is well placed to bring this world-class museum brand to the global marketplace.

“I am excited about the Benaki Museum joining ARTiSTORY’s growing art and cultural IP portfolio.  This is a significant milestone for ARTiSTORY as we expand our portfolio to include more world’s leading cultural organisations from various countries” comments Yizan He, founder & CEO of ARTiSTORY.

“The Benaki Museum, a depository of trust for the Greek and world cultural heritage, enters with enthusiasm into this partnership with ARTiSTORY”, comments Haris Siampanis, CEO of the Benaki Museum in Athens. “For over 90 years now, the Benaki has been safeguarding and disseminating culture, heritage and education while acting as a leading agent of innovation and sustainability endeavours”.

ARTiSTORY secures global licensing rights for the Thyssen-Bornemisza National Museum, Spain

 

 

ARTiSTORY partners with the Benaki Museum, Greece

ARTiSTORY has signed global licensing rights with the Benaki Museum in Greece, adding to its growing portfolio of international cultural partners.

The Benaki Museum opened its doors in 1931 in Athens and is among the most extensive and innovative museums in Europe. Arranged across ten buildings, it welcomes over 450,000 visitors a year to its galleries and exhibitions, performing arts hub, manufacturing and research facilities and pioneering shop.

ARTiSTORY will be creating designs inspired by the Museum’s extensive collections, which include over 120,000 works of art, 200,000 books, 1 million photographs, and thousands of rare documents covering Greek and Roman Archaeology, Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Art, Early Modern Greek Material Culture, Modern and Contemporary Greek Photography, Architecture and Design, Music and Performing Arts but also Islamic, Chinese, Pre-Columbian American, African and Korean Art, as well as an extensive collection of toys and games from around the world.

The Benaki Museum joins ARTiSTORY’s prestigious group of other cultural partners: the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the National Gallery, London; Brooklyn Museum, New York; the National Palace Museum, Taipei; Dunhuang Culture & Tourism Group, China; and the Thyssen-Bornemisza National Museum, Madrid.

With offices in London, Barcelona, Boston, Singapore, Beijing and Shanghai, ARTiSTORY, with support from its investment partner Sinofaith IP Investment Company (SIPIC), is well placed to bring this world-class museum brand to the global marketplace.

“I am excited about the Benaki Museum joining ARTiSTORY’s growing art and cultural IP portfolio.  This is a significant milestone for ARTiSTORY as we expand our portfolio to include more world’s leading cultural organisations from various countries” comments Yizan He, founder & CEO of ARTiSTORY.

“The Benaki Museum, a depository of trust for the Greek and world cultural heritage, enters with enthusiasm into this partnership with ARTiSTORY”, comments Haris Siampanis, CEO of the Benaki Museum in Athens. “For over 90 years now, the Benaki has been safeguarding and disseminating culture, heritage and education while acting as a leading agent of innovation and sustainability endeavours”.

ARTiSTORY secures global licensing rights for the Thyssen-Bornemisza National Museum, Spain

 

 

ARTiSTORY secures global licensing rights for the Thyssen-Bornemisza National Museum, Spain

Art and cultural specialist ARTiSTORY has partnered with the Thyssen-Bornemisza National Museum, Madrid, to build its global licensing programme. The addition of the Thyssen-Bornemisza National Museum to ARTiSTORY’s portfolio shows the company’s commitment to working with the leading cultural organisations around the world.

The Thyssen-Bornemisza National Museum joins cultural partners for ARTiSTORY including the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the National Gallery, London; Brooklyn Museum; the National Palace Museum, Taipei, and Dunhuang Culture & Tourism Group, China.

One of Madrid’s “Golden Triangle of Art” museums and located in the main boulevard of the city, the museum holds over 1,600 iconic paintings, including artworks by Italian, Dutch, German and English artists ranging from the 13th to 20th centuries. Collected over two generations of the Thyssen-Bornemisza family, in 1993 the collection became a public museum for all to enjoy and admire, now known at ‘Everyone’s Museum’.

Vincent van Gogh, Edgar Degas, Berthe Morisot, Édouard Manet, John Singer Sargent and Paul Cézanne are just a handful of the great artists seen in the museum. Key art movements including the Renaissance, Expressionism, Impressionism and Cubism are represented, alongside medieval art from the likes of Jan Van Eyck and Albrecht Dürer.

The Thyssen-Bornemisza National Museum is no stranger to licensing and has created a wealth of licensed collections over the years, with Swatch and Winsor & Newton, among others. Designs inspired by the museum’s artworks will be featured in ARTiSTORY’s Global Theme launches for 2023 – details of the Spring/Summer 2023 launch to follow soon.

“I’m very pleased to have signed our first Spanish Museum, giving us two European, two American and two Asian cultural sites within our portfolio,” says Natasha Dyson, co-founder and licensing director of ARTiSTORY. “The Thyssen-Bornemisza National Museum adds dozens of new modern artists for our creative teams to be inspired by, expanding our range of early 20th-century art, among many more iconic masterpieces. We look forward to working together, bringing these works to a range of product categories.”

“For the Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza, this partnership with ARTiSTORY above all represents the chance to make its great masterpieces of painting internationally known beyond its own walls and galleries and thus reach the largest number of people, and also to establish contacts with potential collaborators in the design field,” adds Ana Cela, head of the Museo Thyssen’s Book and Giftshop.

A style guide for Collections containing Thyssen-Bornemisza National Museum creatives will be available in the coming months. For more information contact natasha@artistorybrands.net.

ARTiSTORY’s Seasons of Impressionists creatives set to travel the world with uin Footwear

Art and cultural IP specialist ARTiSTORY has licensed global creative rights excluding China to the Spanish footwear brand uin for launching a new collection in partnership with the National Gallery Company, London.

The DTC brand, known for its colourful art-inspired footwear, has chosen ARTiSTORY creatives inspired by timeless classics housed in the National Gallery, London, by the great artists of Impressionism: Vincent van Gogh, Claude Monet, Georges Seurat and Edgar Degas. The exclusive collection, entitled “A Timeless Journey”, combines ARTiSTORY’s contemporary take on masterpieces such as Vincent Van Gogh’s Sunflowers and Monet’s The Water Lily Pond  with uin’s innovative and comfortable footwear, perfectly showcasing their core passions – travel and art.

“uin Art Travel Shoes is determined to create a new category of travel shoes, combining simple but natural and comfortable products with creative artistic patterns,” says Fernando Acevedo, Cofounder and Chief Designer of uin. “We are excited to set forth on this timeless journey together with images of the National Gallery’s masterpieces.” 

Seasons of Impressionists is one of the 17 creative collections available to be licensed via ARTiSTORY’s unique “Artefacts to Merchandise” and storytelling model, inspired by the archives of its museum partners.

ARTiSTORY’s Founder and CEO Yizan He says: “We’re delighted to be working with uin on this collaboration with the National Gallery Company and look forward to joining this timeless journey with our partners, witnessing art stories travelling the world.”

Artifacts and the arts effect | ARTiSTORY explores cultural IP licensing’s current burst of energy

With the reopening of cultural and heritage sites and museums across the globe, so too is the cultural IP licensing space seeing a burst of energy, fuelled by increased staffing and a renewed understanding of its importance towards the success of the sector.

Co-founder and managing director of ARTiSTORY, Yizan He, has told Licensing.biz that increased staff across the licensing arms of many global cultural organisations is ‘an excellent sign of the realisation of the value of IP licensing.’

“Many cultural organisations have realised the potential that a licensing programme can achieve for them in terms of revenue stream and engagement with a wider global audience,” Yizan He explained.

“Many have already set up their licensing programmes in recent months, particularly during the pandemic when most museums were closed. On the other hand, cultural organisations are getting a lot more inquiries from brands, retailers, and licensing agencies.

“The cultural licensing sector is undoubtedly growing rapidly.”

ARTiSTORY has witnessed the growth first hand, having seen the business establish a fully global presence in the short few months since it was launched in 2020. The firm’s portfolio now includes the National Palace Museum in Taiwan, while it is close to announcing a new partnership with a major London museum, and making preparations to add a leading American museum and a top performing Chinese IP to the mix in the coming weeks.

With the art and cultural IP space proving to be such a rich ground for licensing right now, we caught up with ARTiSTORY’s Yizan He to learn more about the team’s plans.

Hello Yizan, it’s been a while since we last caught up! How has the ARTiSTORY business and portfolio grown and progressed since then? With cultural sites and museums now reopening, what is the mood in the space like right now?

ARTiSTORY has been growing rapidly since we started our business in 2020. Our portfolio includes the National Palace Museum from Taiwan, we’re close to announcing a leading London museum and we will soon add a leading American museum and a Chinese top IP to our portfolio in the next few weeks. 

Our master license rights with these art and cultural organisations cover all key markets such as the EU/UK, North America and Asia. Our creative teams in Asia and Europe are currently developing the 2022 art and cultural IP licensing trends and themes which will be released in July this year. 

With museums and cultural organisations reopening, many organisations are now adding staff to drive the licensing business, which is an excellent sign as cultural organisations have realised the importance and value of IP licensing.

 

How has the art and culture licensing sector performed over the past year? There have obviously been hardships across the live sector, what impact, if any did this have on the licensing aspect? Did it drive demand further, did it fuel a shift to licensing in any capacity?

Driven by the growing demand for art and cultural IP, the cultural licensing sector is snowballing, which has caught many by surprise. As reported by Licensing International in early May 2021, that art and cultural IP has risen from merely one per cent in 2015 to 18.7 per cent in terms of the retail value of licensed merchandise in China in 2020. Art and cultural IP has become the second most important property type.

There is a visible impact as more and more retailers and consumer brands are embracing art and cultural IP licensing as ways to engage shoppers and improve profit margins. Many companies have tapped into art and cultural IP in recent years from luxury brands such as LVMH to global retailers such as Uniqlo and Zara. That will further inspire more brands and retailers to explore art and cultural IP.

 

What role has ARTiSTORY played in the art and culture/heritage licensing space over this period? What is it that ARTiSTORY brings to the culture licensing sector, and how does this differ from the licensing agencies out there?

ARTiSTORY has a unique business model that sets us apart from licensing agencies. First of all, we secure a multi-year exclusive master license agreement covering a full range of merchandise in our markets, and of course, with a commitment to Minimum Guaranteed Royalties. Secondly, we invest heavily in the annual art and cultural theme and design asset development, an essential component in any cultural licensing program and we own the copyrights of the design assets. We then enter into licensing agreements with consumer brands and retailers directly, and support them with versatile forms of marketing and storytelling such as live stream, short videos, social media campaigns on Tiktok, and immersive store windows and installations.    

As a pioneer and innovator in the cultural licensing sector, ARTiSTORY’s founding members have previously developed some of the most successful licensing programs for the world’s top museums such as the British Museum, the V&A, the MET, Museum of Fine Art, Boston, and National Gallery. We hope to bring our new business model to the cultural licensing sector.

What do museums and galleries gain from working with ARTiSTORY as opposed to other licensing agencies? How do you separate yourselves from the competition in this sector?

There is a wide range of tangible benefits that museums and cultural organisations would benefit from a licensing program.  Firstly, there is immediate and recurrent revenue as ARTiSTORY commits financially with advance payments upon signing the master licensing agreement. On top of the advance payments, there are running royalties that we would share with our museum partners every quarter.  

Most importantly, every licensed product comes with a card that illustrates the artefacts from the museum’s collection where the design inspirations come from.  Additionally, all promotional licensing partnerships across a truly diverse array of industries recognise the collaborating museum, which promote the awareness of the museums. Our licensing programmes have expanded the museums’ reach to a much broader global audience, inspiring them to learn more about the museums.   

What role do you think ARTiSTORY has to play in the future of the art & culture / heritage licensing sector? How are you guys innovating in the sector and helping shape a future for licensing within it?

Our business model has been proven unique and compelling. We will continue to ride on the momentum, beef up our storytelling and marketing capabilities, and expand our licensing program in new markets such as the EU/UK and North America. We aim to become a truly global player.

To stay ahead of the competition, we are already working on various storytelling as an additional dimension to engage more audiences more effectively. For example, our immersive team is working on immersive store window designs, immersive pop-up stores, and installation that our licensees and retailers can leverage for better shopper acquisitions and conversion. We’ve gained an excellent response from our licensees and now offer these immersive components as part of our licensing package.

 

When it comes to licensing, why is this an important sector to get right? What can good licensing do for the heritage or narrative of a cultural brand? Also, when working with brands steeped in history and heritage, what sort of pressure is there to get the licensing tone right first time? 

This is a very good question. The core mission of a museum is about conservation, research, and education. During the development of the licensing themes, artefact selection, and content creation, we work closely with our museum partners so that we can maintain a high level of accuracy in terms of the narratives that we develop while staying sensitive about different cultures and markets. 

We enjoy outstanding support from all our museum partners. For example, the licensing team at National Palace Museum has provided us with their curatorial advice and suggestion of artefacts when we jointly work on the upcoming 2022 themes.  

In the future, we will also be developing art education programs that in one way, extend cultural organisations’ core mission of educating the public and in another, leverage the value of art and culture in key education systems and markets. 

What are some of the most exciting partnerships (your own or others) in the heritage licensing space at the moment? What inspiration do you or can you draw from these?

I am glad that there are more and more inspirational art and cultural IP licensing programs in recent months, such as Spanish fashion retailer Pull & Bear taps into modern and contemporary art as their licensing program with the Tate feature artworks by Kandinsky. 

Uniqlo has already launched many programs with MoMA and recently with the Louvre. In the Far East, National Palace Museum has a wide range of well designed and crafted licensed products. The list goes on…

Is the cultural licensing sector heading in the right direction?

Yes, many cultural organisations have realised the potential that a licensing program can achieve for them in terms of revenue stream and engagement with a wider global audience. Many have already set up their licensing programs in recent months, particularly during the pandemic when most museums were closed. 

On the other hand, cultural organisations are getting a lot more inquiries from brands, retailers and licensing agencies.  The cultural licensing sector is undoubtedly growing rapidly.

And before we let you go, what’s the next step for ARTiSTORY?

ARTiSTORY has assembled a sales team covering various European markets, and sales training is already underway. Our next step is to establish our head office in the US and build a sales network there. It is our strategic goal that we would achieve our coverage on three key markets – the EU/UK, North America, and Asia – making ARTiSTORY a truly global player offering full market coverage to our museum partners as well as our clients.  

Thank you, Yizan. Is there anything you want to leave us with?

Thank you for giving me the opportunity to share with the audience about my company. ARTiSTORY looks forward to contributing more to the cultural licensing sector.